Christopher Williams

Christopher Williams

CAREER HISTORY

Along with being a regular contributor to Yahoo Voices, I am a staff historian/writer for "The Baseball Almanac" website and a contributor to "Phillies Nation," a website dedicate to the Philadelphia Phillies baseball team.
Author of three children’s books about working dogs. The One Incredible Dog! Series was published by Keene Books/Moo Press of Warwick, NY from 2004-2007. Lady showed the important duties of a Therapy Dog, Boone dealt with the work of a Search and Rescue canine and Kizzy described a busy day in the life of a Reading Assistance Dog.

Also the author of the children’s picture book Dinner for Alex (2009) BookSurge Publishing

Additional publishing credits include short stories in THE DOOR, STANDARD, POWER FOR LIVING, CONQUEST, LIVE, POWER STATION and other publications.

Past contributor to TODAY AND TOMORROW Magazine based in Landisville, PA.


OTHER CAREER EXPERIENCE

98.5 the PEAK, York, PA. 2006-present
Saturday morning radio personality (6-10am)
On-air duties plus gathering and writing material for
show preparation.

WHVR-AM, Hanover, PA 2006-2012
Newscaster/Newswriter
Anchored afternoon newscasts on 5,000 watt AM radio
station. On-air broadcast duties plus responsible for writing and editing new stories
from numerous sources.

WRBS-FM, Baltimore, MD. 1994-2005
Full-time evening announcer/board-operator.
On-air broadcast duties plus responsibility for writing short promotional announcements
for syndicated programming that ran on station.

CERTIFIED DOG TRAINER 2012-present
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Contributor since
1/17/2013

Education/Experience

B.A. in Communications from Almeda College and University, Boise, ID

Motto

The Write Man

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Displaying Results 1 - 28 (of 28) for All Content
  • Harold Jackson Belongs in the Hall of Fame
    The speedy wide-receiver caught more passes, gained more receiving yards, and caught more TD passes in the 1970s than anyone else. Why isn't he in the Pro Football Hall of Fame?
  • Tough-As-Nails Tom Woodeshick
    Tom Woodeshick was a bruising fullback who played for the Philadelphia Eagles from 1963-71. Statistically, he's high on the team's all-time list of greatest runners but few seem to remember him. Why?
  • Why Did the Eagles Trade Sonny Jurgensen?
    In one of the dumbest trades in NFL history, the Philadelphia Eagles traded Sonny Jurgensen to the Washington Redskins in 1964. What were they thinking?
  • Were the "Black Sox" the Better Team?
    It is widely-believed that the 1919 Chicago White Sox were superior to their World Series opponent, the Cincinnati Reds. However, statistics don't support this belief and the Reds did have a legitimate shot at winning the series without the fix.
  • Quiet Tony Gonzalez
    Outfielder Tony Gonzalez was .286 lifetime hitter and one of the best glove men in the National League, leading in fielding percentage three times. It's time to remember Number 25!
  • The Chicago College All-Star Game
    The Chicago College Football Game was an annual exhibition match-up between college all-stars and the best team in the NFL. From 1934-76, the stars and pros played at Solider Field, often before crowds exceeding 100,000.
  • The Mystery of the 1906 White Sox
    Dubbed "The Hitless Wonders," the 1906 Chicago White Sox stunned the baseball world by winning the pennant and then toppling the powerful Cubs in the World Series. How did they do it? First, you need to look beyond just the batting averages.
  • The Mystery of the 1965 Yankees
    How did the 1965 New York Yankees go from the World Series to mediocre "also-rans" in just one season? The answer lies in the club's offensive production that year.
  • Remembering Terry Harmon
    Terry Harmon was a solid utility man for the Phillies from 1969-78. Along with being a fine fielder, Harmon had seasons in which he hit .284 and .295.
  • The Mendoza Line
    The namesake of baseball's "Mendoza Line" was not as bad as he is remembered to have been.
  • A Year (Or Two) in Philadelphia
    For many of baseball's elite players, playing for Philly spelled the end-of-the-line after fine careers.
  • The Mystery of the 1930 Phillies
    With five regulars who hit well over .300 and subs with averages of .331, .341 and .380, the 1930 Phillies were never a contender. What happened?
  • See You in September
    Watching a young major league player over the last month of the season can answer a lot of questions.
  • The Reinvention of Robin Roberts
    Hall-of-Fame pitcher Robin Roberts looked finished in the early 60s. However, the right-handed hurler battled through knee miseries that forced him to tweak his approach and became a valuable member of the Orioles and later the Astros.
  • September 15, 1967
    An appreciative son remembers a windswept 1967 doubleheader between the Phillies and the Dodgers.
  • Deron Johnson's Comeback
    His career looked to be over in 1968 but Johnson worked hard to become Philly's main long ball threat in the early 1970s.
  • The Mystery of the 1966 Chicago Cubs
    The 1966 Chicago Cubs had a potent starting line-up and a legendary manager. How did they manage to finish last in a 10 team league?
  • Three Must-See Comedies
    The classic comedies "A Hard Day's Night," "Horse Feathers," and "And Now For Something Completely Different" share a legacy of decades of laughter. What makes these flicks so funny?
  • Gimme Some Truth, Monkees Style
    !960's supergroup, The Monkees, have been unfairly dissed for "not playing their own instruments." The boys could play and after a confrontation with their record company,they were allowed to contribute musically to subsequent recordings.
  • Lights, Camera, Jackie!
    Along with being a great ballplayer and civil rights pioneer, Jackie Robinson one-stint behind the film camera was memorable. in 1950, he played himself in "The Jackie Robinson Story."
  • Rock Hall-Of-Fame Stiffs Moody Blues Again
    The Moody Blues have sold over 70 million albums since the 1960s, recorded classic singles like "Nights in White Satin," "I'm Just A Singer," and "Ride My See-Saw" but aren't in the Rock and Roll Hall-of-Fame. Why?
  • The One-Year Buzz: The Incredible Story of Russell Loris Arlett
    Buzz Arlett had one of the most unusual careers in baseball history. After hitting .313 as a rookie in 1931, finishing 4th in the NL in homers, he was back in the minors in '32. What happened?
  • Can Michael Young Still Do it at 36?
    Infielder Michael Young is wearing a new uniform for the first time in 13 years. The long-time Ranger is now a Phillie and at age 36, some think Young's best days are behind him. What does history say?
  • More Than Just a Bagel
    A humorous, tongue-in-cheek look at the Bagel's place in history.
  • Echoes of Dealey Plaza: The JFK Assassination
    A student of the JFK assassination decides to step away but urges others to keep searching for answers to the events of November 22, 1963.
  • Are Dog Training Classes Necessary?
    Formal dog training is very important for pet owners who want well-behaved and happy pets. Resources are available for those who want to do it themselves; Formal classes are a great option for most people who are too busy to do it themselves.
  • The Last Days of Connie Mack Stadium
    An aging baby-boomer vividly remembers his last visit to one of baseball's great old ballparks, Connie Mack Stadium.
  • When Baseball was Baseball
    The discovery of a long-forgotten tape recording offers a humorous glimpse baseball in the early 20th century.

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